I Capture the Castle, by Dodie Smith

Title: I Capture the Castle
Author:
Dodie Smith
Publisher:
 Vintage Classics
Publication date: 1948 
Pages: 408
ISBN: 0099460874
Source: Tea Party Princess
Rating: 
5/5
Buy at: BookDepository

 

Synopsis

‘This book has one of the most charismatic narrators I’ve ever met’ J. K. Rowling.

‘I write this sitting in the kitchen sink’ is the first line of this timeless, witty and enchanting novel about growing up. Cassandra Mortmain lives with her bohemian and impoverished family in a crumbling castle in the middle of nowhere. Her journal records her life with her beautiful, bored sister, Rose, her fadingly glamorous stepmother, Topaz, her little brother Thomas and her eccentric novelist father who suffers from a financially crippling writer’s block. However, all their lives are turned upside down when the American heirs to the castle arrive and Cassandra finds herself falling in love for the first time…
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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, by Washington Irving

Title: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
Author:
Washington Irving
Publisher:
Wildside Press
Release date: March 1st 2004 (originally published in 1820)
Pages: 108
ISBN: 0809594080
Source: Myself
Rating: 1.5/5
Buy at: BookDepository


Synopsis

The chief part of the stories, however, turned upon the favorite specter of Sleepy Hollow, the Headless Horseman, who had been heard several times of late, patrolling the country; and, it was said, tethered his horse nightly among the graves in the churchyard. The story was immediately matched by a thrice marvelous adventure of Brom Bones, who made light of the Galloping Hessian as an arrant jockey. He affirmed that on returning one night from the neighboring village of Sing Sing, he had been overtaken by this midnight trooper; that he had offered to race with him for a bowl of punch, and should have won it too, for Daredevil beat the goblin horse all hollow, but just as they came to the church bridge, the Hessian bolted, and vanished in a flash of fire. All these tales, told in that drowsy undertone with which men talk in the dark, the countenances of the listeners only now and then receiving a casual gleam from the glare of a pipe, sank deep in the mind of Ichabod.

(taken from the story) Continue reading